Potopis

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    5,00

    Welcome to the Village of Eternity. Campodimele, Italy, has for some time attracted the interest of the medical community: the people here lead extraordinarily long lives, enjoy low blood pressure and low cholesterol, and stay active and healthy to their last years.
    What is it about this place that makes it so easy to live well and long? In A Year in the Village of Eternity, Tracey Lawson goes beyond the medical figures, immersing herself in the lifestyle and timeless eating habits of this vibrant place. Daybreak in Campodimele finds villagers in their seventies and eighties rising to tend their olive trees, chasing their chickens uphill, or weaving through mountain roads on a Vespa.
    In Campodimele, the seasons and the bounty of the land dictate the food on the table, and each month brings its own traditions of harvesting and foraging, cooking and preserving. The villagers are warm and welcoming, sharing the recipes handed down from generation to generation, and Lawson offers over one hundred of those same recipes here, from simply dressed salads to homemade sausages and fresh egg pasta. She introduces us to the cicerchie, a legume particular to this elevated spot, high in protein and free of cholesterol, and key to zuppa della nonna, “grandmother’s soup.” There’s lamb cooked over charcoal; a zucchini soup that uses stalks, leaves, and flowers; preserved sweet red peppers; fig jam; and celebratory sweets like almond cake and a ricotta tart with cinnamon.
    With beautiful photographs of the dishes, the people, and the countryside of Campodimele, A Year in the Village of Eternity brims with warmth, generosity, tradition, and flavor. Here we can learn secrets not only of living longer, but of living every moment to the fullest.

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    6,00

    In 1957 Nicholas Mosley and Hugo Charteris, two novelists, made a journey by car from Dakar to Lagos across West Africa. Their route took them partly through the progressive and nationalist areas of the coast, but more especially to the primitive tribes of the interior; so that they seemed “to be moving up and down the country not only in space, but also in centuries, as if we were travellers on a time machine'”.

    They saw the colourful world of French Senegal, and visited the Diamond Mines in Sierra Leone where hundreds of illicit diggers have rioted and died; they were present at a festival of the Toma tribe when the young girls of the tribe came out of the Sacred Forest after their years of initiation and attended the Independence Day celebrations of Ghana–the crisis-point of African Nationalism.

    The story of this journey takes the reader through one of the most kaleidoscopic and fast-moving areas in the world and brings to life scenes and places at present in the forefront of the news; and also those of the mysterious African past which is disappearing so rapidly.

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    5,00

    A small stone house deep among the olive groves of Liguria, going for the price of a dodgy second-hand car. Annie Hawes and her sister, on the spot by chance, have no plans whatsoever to move to the Italian Riviera but find naturally that it’s an offer they can’t refuse. The laugh is on the Foreign Females who discover that here amongst the hardcore olive farming folk their incompetence is positively alarming. Not to worry: the thrifty villagers of Diano San Pietro are on the case, and soon plying the Pallid Sisters with advice, ridicule, tall tales and copious hillside refreshments

  • 6,00

    Travelling and tekking in with a teenage family in Nepal – Ed and Louise Hillary, the parents of Peter (17), Sarah (15) and Belinda (13).
    “The aim of our journey was to visit and work on various Hillary Aid projects in the Everest region of the Himalayas. Due to Pakistan/India war of December 1971 there were delays, complications and adventures before we finally reached Nepal, two weeks late in starting on our busy programme.
    We walked and floated on air mattresses down sixty miles of the swift Sun Kosi river, east of Kathmandu, and then travelled north-east across high ridges that Ed and our Sherpas had never visited before – and discovered many Sherpa villages we didn’t know existed. From high frost covered foothills we had brilliant and breathtaking views of the winter Himalayas. We became deeply involved in the glorious chaos of aid to the Sherpas as we travelled from village to village and were offered hospitality so generous and continuous that it was ruinous to our health but utterly delightful.
    We talked to village councils, were petitioned for new bridges and water pipelines, worked for two days carrying rocks for the foundations of a new school, and learned the uncomfortable art of carrying bamboo baskets on our backs, secured by a headband across the forehead.
    Our visit ended with the celebration of New Year with our Sherpa friends in Kunde village (12,700ft), coinciding with the winter snows. The local beer and spirits flowed like water and we hardly noticed the cold. We certainly had a high old time.”

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    5,00

    It started as a daydream. Poring over a map of the world at home one quiet Saturday afternoon, Ewan McGregor – actor and self-confessed bike nut – noticed that it was possible to ride all the way round the world, with just one short hop across the Bering Strait from Russia to Alaska. It was a revelation he couldn’t get out of his head. So he picked up the phone and called Charley Boorman, his best friend, fellow actor and bike enthusiast. ‘Charley,’ he said. ‘I think you ought to come over for dinner…’

    From London to New York, Ewan and Charley chased their shadows through Europe, the Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Mongolia and Russia, across the Pacific to Alaska, then down through Canada and America. But as the miles slipped beneath the tyres of their big BMWs, their troubles started. Exhaustion, injury and accidents tested their strength. Treacherous roads, unpredictable weather and turbulent politics challenged their stamina. They were chased by paparazzi in Kazakhstan, courted by men with very large guns in the Ukraine, hassled by the police, and given bulls’ testicles for supper by Mongolian nomads.

    And yet despite all these obstacles they managed to ride over twenty thousand miles in four months, changing their lives forever in the process. As they travelled they documented their trip, taking photographs, and writing diaries by the campfire. Long Way Round is the result of their adventures – a fascinating, frank and highly entertaining travel book about two friends riding round the world together and, against all the odds, realising their dream.

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Prikazovanje 1–12 od 27 rezultatov