Avtobiografija

Avtobiografija
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    5,00

    At age 17, Amir Khan became Britain’s youngest Olympic boxer since 1976 when he won silver at the 2004 Olympics in Athens. He turned professional in 2005 and has remained unbeaten ever since, with tickets to his fights sell out in hours. He has also emerged as the poster boy for British multiculturalism and an important role model for Asian youngsters. This hard-hitting autobiography tells the story of a boy who Don King has compared to Sugar Ray Robinson, but who still lives at his parent’s home with his sister and two younger brothers. Amir remains religious–he continues to fast in the Islamic holy month of Ramadan even when he has a major fight the next day–as well as down to earth, as he can sometimes be spotted helping out on the register at his uncle and aunt’s curry restaurant if they are having a busy night.

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    5,00

    Welcome to the Village of Eternity. Campodimele, Italy, has for some time attracted the interest of the medical community: the people here lead extraordinarily long lives, enjoy low blood pressure and low cholesterol, and stay active and healthy to their last years.
    What is it about this place that makes it so easy to live well and long? In A Year in the Village of Eternity, Tracey Lawson goes beyond the medical figures, immersing herself in the lifestyle and timeless eating habits of this vibrant place. Daybreak in Campodimele finds villagers in their seventies and eighties rising to tend their olive trees, chasing their chickens uphill, or weaving through mountain roads on a Vespa.
    In Campodimele, the seasons and the bounty of the land dictate the food on the table, and each month brings its own traditions of harvesting and foraging, cooking and preserving. The villagers are warm and welcoming, sharing the recipes handed down from generation to generation, and Lawson offers over one hundred of those same recipes here, from simply dressed salads to homemade sausages and fresh egg pasta. She introduces us to the cicerchie, a legume particular to this elevated spot, high in protein and free of cholesterol, and key to zuppa della nonna, “grandmother’s soup.” There’s lamb cooked over charcoal; a zucchini soup that uses stalks, leaves, and flowers; preserved sweet red peppers; fig jam; and celebratory sweets like almond cake and a ricotta tart with cinnamon.
    With beautiful photographs of the dishes, the people, and the countryside of Campodimele, A Year in the Village of Eternity brims with warmth, generosity, tradition, and flavor. Here we can learn secrets not only of living longer, but of living every moment to the fullest.

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    10,00

    We all know that growing up is hard to do, and sometimes the only thing that makes it better are the reassuring words of someone who has walked that bumpy road just a few steps ahead of you and somehow ended up as a fully-functioning adult. Carrie Hope Fletcher is that person.* Thanks to her phenomenally popular YouTube videos, Carrie has become an ‘honorary big sister’ to hundreds of thousands of young people who turn to her for advice, friendship and, most of all, the knowledge that things will get better.

    Carrie has created a safe and positive space for young people to connect and share their hopes and concerns online, and now she will share her most personal thoughts and experiences in her first book, ALL I KNOW NOW. Part memoir, part advice guide, it will include Carrie’s thoughts on some of the topics she’s asked about most regularly: bullying, body image, relationships and perhaps the scariest question of all: what does the future hold for me? With warmth, wit and a sprinkling of hard-won wisdom, Carrie will provide the essential tools for growing up gracefully . . . most of the time.

  • 7,00

    One of Marie Fleming’s last acts before she died from Multiple Sclerosis in late 2013 was to complete her memoir. A woman described by the High Court President as ‘one of the most remarkable witnesses to come before the courts’, during her landmark case against the Irish State to lift the ban on assisted suicide, here she tells the personal story behind the public face.
    From her young years growing up in Donegal, as she struggled to keep her family together after her mother left, to her battle to keep her own first-born child, born when she herself was still a teenager, to her later quest for education and self-betterment, against the odds, An Act of Love is an unforgettable story of ambition and of life lived to the full, of coming to terms with MS, and of sorrow and abiding love.
    It’s also the story of a court case which, although lost, nonetheless succeeded in bringing a crucial issue – a person’s right to die with dignity – into keen public and political focus. Full of courage and quiet dignity, An Act of Love is an outstanding book for our times.

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    3,00

    Brian Keenan went to Beirut in 1985 for a change of scene from his native Belfast. He became headline news when he was kidnapped by fundamentalist Shi’ite militiamen and held in the suburbs of Beirut for the next four and a half years. For much of that time he was shut off from all news and contact with anyone other than his jailers and, later, his fellow hostages, amongst them John McCarthy

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    8,00

    Double acts don’t come any closer than the The Two Ronnies. Messrs Barker and Corbett kept a nation laughing for two decades, and yet despite the rigorous work that went into writing, rehearsing and broadcasting almost a hundred episodes to millions of viewers each week, the pair never shared a cross word. In this memoir, the late Ronnie Corbett tells the story of their rise from theatre, through The Frost Report and into their own legendary show, as well as how some of their greatest sketches, including Mastermind and Fork Handles, came into being. This is the story of one of the great British institutions of the last thirty years, and a hilarious and moving look inside the working lives of two of our most-beloved comedians.

  • 4,00

    Already a bestseller in England, Morrison’s memoir of his father’s life and death is both moving and intelligent. His subject is universal: the life and death of a parent, a father at once beloved and exasperating, competent and inept, charming and infuriating, strong and terribly vulnerable. A classic of family literature.

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    5,00

    Imbued on every page with Frank McCourt’s astounding humor and compassion. This is a glorious book that bears all the marks of a classic.

    “When I look back on my childhood I wonder how I managed to survive at all. It was, of course, a miserable childhood: the happy childhood is hardly worth your while. Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood, and worse yet is the miserable Irish Catholic childhood.”

    So begins the Pulitzer Prize winning memoir of Frank McCourt, born in Depression-era Brooklyn to recent Irish immigrants and raised in the slums of Limerick, Ireland. Frank’s mother, Angela, has no money to feed the children since Frank’s father, Malachy, rarely works, and when he does he drinks his wages. Yet Malachy– exasperating, irresponsible and beguiling– does nurture in Frank an appetite for the one thing he can provide: a story. Frank lives for his father’s tales of Cuchulain, who saved Ireland, and of the Angel on the Seventh Step, who brings his mother babies.

    Perhaps it is story that accounts for Frank’s survival. Wearing rags for diapers, begging a pig’s head for Christmas dinner and gathering coal from the roadside to light a fire, Frank endures poverty, near-starvation and the casual cruelty of relatives and neighbors–yet lives to tell his tale with eloquence, exuberance and remarkable forgiveness.

    Angela’s Ashes, imbued on every page with Frank McCourt’s astounding humor and compassion, is a glorious book that bears all the marks of a classic.

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    5,00

    Lorna’s story is amazing and it touched my heart”
    Roma Downey Actress/ Producer and Star of Touched By An Angel

    Angels in My Hair is the autobiography of Lorna Byrne, a modern day Irish mystic with the powers of the saints of old.

    Lorna physically sees and talks with angels every day and has done so ever since she was a baby. As a young child, she assumed everyone could see the angels who always accompanied her, but adults thought she suffered from a mental disability because she did not seem to be focusing on the world around her. Today, sick and troubled people from all around the world are drawn to her for comfort and healing, and theologians of different faiths seek her guidance.

    Angels in My Hair is a moving and deeply inspirational chronicle of Lorna’s remarkable life story. Invoking a wonderful sense of place, she describes growing up poor in Ireland, and marrying the man of her dreams—only to have the marriage cut short by tragedy.

    An international bestseller, translated into 23 languages, Angels in My Hair has garnered overwhelming responses from readers from all walks of life giving them hope and helping them to realize that no matter how alone they might feel they always have a Guardian angel by their side.
    Now includes a chapter on how to connect to your angel and an afterword on angels and America

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    4,00

    Adrift in Tokyo, translating obscene rap lyrics for giggling Japanese high school girls, “thirtynothing” Robert Twigger comes to a revelation about himself: He has never been fit nor brave. Guided by his roommates, Fat Frank and Chris, he sets out to cleanse his body and mind. Not knowing his fist from his elbow, the author is drawn into the world of Japanese martial arts, joining the Tokyo Riot Police on their yearlong, brutally demanding course of budo training, where any ascetic motivation soon comes up against bloodstained “white pyjamas” and fractured collarbones. In Angry White Pyjamas, Twigger blends, the ancient with the modern–the ultratraditionalism, ritual, and violence of the dojo (training academy) with the shopping malls, nightclubs, and scenes of everyday Tokyo life in the 1990s–to provide a brilliant, bizarre glimpse of life in contemporary Japan.

  • 5,00

    As a young reporter, Celia Walden receives an unusual assignment: track down a global superstar and keep him away from all other journalists. That man is soccer player George Best, who made his debut for Manchester United at age seventeen and was the star of a star team throughout the 1960s. Enormously skilled and ruggedly handsome, idolized by men and women alike, he was referred to as “the fifth Beatle,” and still holds a firm place among the world’s all-time best players.

    But in 2004, George Best is nearing sixty and deteriorating like a much older man. A notorious alcoholic and philanderer, he has just received a liver transplant and has Antabuse tablets sewn into his stomach lining. His wife has left him again. When Celia finds him in a bar in Malta, he isn’t exactly delighted to see her. He’s been chased by journalists all his life. Yet as Celia’s assignment to “babysit” George around the clock stretches out over months, an unlikely sort of friendship develops, and she gets to know George as a funny, volatile, and complex human being, an avid reader and member of MENSA, ravaged by alcohol and gradually withering under the constant glare of the spotlight.

    Babysitting George is a tender account of a unique relationship between a young journalist and a dying star. It questions the exploitative nature of tabloid journalism; the terrifying, all-consuming nature of addiction; and the implausible meetings that can change one’s life.

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